Man’s greatest emotion is #fear

This week’s media and legal events confirm that man’s greatest emotion is not love, but fear.

Fear of people who are different from us, whether due to religious beliefs or their choice of who they want to love .

Fear of letting go of the past, whether due to how a state was treated after the Civil War or of the beating taken on a bridge in Selma.

Fear of being attacked even at the risk of losing one’s personal liberties.

Fear.

The question is, is there enough love to quell the fear or is talk of love merely rhetoric?

About Alton Drew

Alton Drew brings a straight forward and insightful brand of political market intelligence. Alton Drew graduated from the Florida State University with a Bachelor of Science in economics and political science (1984); a Master of Public Administration (1993); and a Juris Doctor (1999). You can also follow Alton Drew on Twitter @altondrew.
This entry was posted in black American, civil rights, liberty, Political Economy, U.S. Constitution and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Man’s greatest emotion is #fear

  1. Kenneth Ciszewski says:

    “This week’s media and legal events confirm that man’s greatest emotion is not love, but fear.”

    Certainly, if you look at what the media reports, the negatives seem to outweigh the positives.

    “Fear of people who are different from us, whether due to religious beliefs or their choice of who they want to love.”

    If all religions were about love, as some think Christianity is (or ought to be), then we would not need to be concerned about different religious beliefs. As long as religious beliefs are about domination, control, and temporal power/power over others/authority over others (everyone should follow only one set of beliefs, because they are the only absolutely true beliefs), there are valid reasons to be concerned. We can still show love and compassion toward those with which we disagree, but we do not have to condone or accept their behavior if it not “loving” (not positive and/or constructive as opposed to trying to control others). We may have to defend ourselves against such “unloving” behavior. We can also decide to “turn the other cheek”.

    “Fear of letting go of the past, whether due to how a state was treated after the Civil War or of the beating taken on a bridge in Selma.”

    I’m not convinced the fear of “…to how a state was treated after the Civil War…” is what much of the discriminatory behavior we find against African Americans in the South is about. I suspect there are long lasting attitudes and beliefs about which group of people is superior or inferior that are at the root of some of this. That’s arrogance and pride, not fear. It’s also a lack of understanding that as human beings, we are all very much alike, despite the fact that each of us is unique.

    Talk of love is not rhetoric, but it is hard to quell fear, because it takes raw courage to take the risk of loving others when they are threatening to us in some way.

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