Comment on #Obama post-SOTU jobs tour

As the President continues his post State of the Union tour, I ask myself, what is missing from the training we receive in our schools.  I have observed that what we are missing, whether in pre-school or in graduate school is a framework for assessing our value and demonstrating that value to a potential employer or client.  We can load up on all the skills we want, but if we are not flexible enough to adjust with changing demands, then it appears from the policy prescription being pushed by Mr. Obama that we will be in school getting new degrees every ten years.  A value driven labor market wouldn’t require that …

About Alton Drew

Alton Drew brings a straight forward and insightful brand of political market intelligence. Alton Drew graduated from the Florida State University with a Bachelor of Science in economics and political science (1984); a Master of Public Administration (1993); and a Juris Doctor (1999). You can also follow Alton Drew on Twitter @altondrew.
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One Response to Comment on #Obama post-SOTU jobs tour

  1. Ken Ciszewski says:

    “I have observed that what we are missing, whether in pre-school or in graduate school is a framework for assessing our value and demonstrating that value to a potential employer or client.”

    The problem of assessing value is a very difficult one for employers, since almost no one has all the training and experience necessary to do every task and solve every problem he will encounter. That means hiring is always a risk.

    In my experience, we do this “demonstration of value” when we apply for jobs or promotions through resumes that describe our training, experience, accomplishments and abilities, and through references from others. Things like diplomas and certifications are a big part of this “demonstration”, and since these appear to be very tangible and to offer concrete proof of something, employers sometimes give them a lot of weight when deciding who is qualified. (These may or may not actually indicate value.) I doubt that this is going to change anytime soon.

    In many situations, continuous and ongoing training is essential as things change.

    In any case, being able to “play it by ear” in solving all kinds of challenges may be the most valuable, and hard to assess skill there is. Go back to the early seasons of “The Apprentice” and watch the kind of challenges Donald Trump gave the (non-celebrity) “apprentices”, and you get a really good look at what people face in the work place every day. Or look at “Undercover Boss” for a different look at what working people have to deal with.

    Tom Peters once wrote that the best reference to help get your next assignment is how well you did in your last assignment. That’s assuming your employer has even been paying attention to what you have accomplished.

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