For Blacks, government is god

Every Monday and Wednesday night I allow myself a little political entertainment by tuning into YouTube and watching Yvette Carnell, founder and editor of Breaking Brown.com. Ms Carnell brings a passion and data driven analysis to political and social events impacting descendants of slaves brought to the United States from Africa. Ms Carnell “keeps it real” about the economic plight of black Americans and is especially scathing of those who fail to view politics as an avenue for obtaining resources, particularly capital, as reparations for the kidnapping and enslavement of Africans and the lingering effects that slavery has on the present members of the African Diaspora brought to America.

Where Ms Carnell loses me is when she proposes that government is the only option for righting wrongs perpetrated by the holders of capital on slaves imported from Africa. Government, as I interpret Ms Carnell, should bear the burden of providing the descendants of African slaves with treatment equal to those received by whites who have certain privileges available to them as a result of their lineage. Ms Carnell rejects talk of black American self-reliance arguing cogently that black American descendant of slaves brought from Africa are at a severe disadvantage because it was never the intent of government to extend sufficient capital in the direction of blacks so that they could thrive in America.

Ms Carnell’s 43,000 YouTube subscribers for the most part agree with her and I know plenty of people, some of them friends, who would sympathize with her position. Government has been the source of oppressive tactics and strategies against blacks in America for centuries. Some blacks also consider government the source of positive change in American society, from the banning of the separate but equal doctrine for schools, common carriers, and other public facilities, to extending universal suffrage to black voters in the South. So while blacks in America perceive the real world as one of pain and suffering, government, the entity that has and still does keep a boot on the throats of blacks, is also viewed as a very present help in trouble.

But rather than god, what if blacks treated government as a protection agency option? I came across this phrase when I read The Sovereign Individual by James Dale Davidson and Lord William Rees-Mogg.  The authors, proponents of a movement from onerous customs and tax districts like the United States, described various governance structures for occupied territories and how modern digital communications technology could enable individuals to either live outside of the barriers of traditional governments or carve out their own sovereign niches within them.

Admittedly the problem with the approach of The Sovereign Individual is the level of capital that one would need in order to exercise the type of autonomy described in the book. It takes a great degree of capital to negotiate the occupancy of a physical space where the individual doesn’t pay traditional taxes; where within carved out areas the individual provides for their own police services and can exercise the right to legally exclude anyone who does not fit their criteria of community.

The biggest problem I believe is mindset. There is a malaise within the black population; a narrative that any attempts at freedom would be met by actions similar to those that took place in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921. Between 31 May and 1 June 1921, a white mob attacked the black American community of Greenwood, a thriving community within Tulsa known as “The Black Wall Street.” Where conversations arise about furthering black economic empowerment, naysayers raise their heads citing the egregious state actions that occurred in Tulsa that Memorial Day weekend.  Almost 100 years after the military and terrorist attack on Greenwood, the survivors of the attack have not been compensated. Petitions to the government have resulted in dedication of a park and some scholarships for descendants. Can anyone say that the State has dome right by its black American parishioners? Can blacks afford to use the memories of these behaviors to prohibit them from getting out of State-sponsored hell?

For blacks, government is god. This god is not benevolent and sooner or later, the church service has to end.

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