We own our thoughts. They are the last frontier…

A few days ago, a colleague and I had a brief conversation on colonization. How was it that the European was able to take over a large land mass and extract its natural and human resources so brutally and without effective resistance?  My colleague’s answer: “Once your mind is taken over, everything else falls.”

Thought, in my opinion, is the ultimate form of capital.  Every man-made construct around you emanates from it.  In a society so fixated on the physical act, it is easy to overlook the role of thought.  We don’t admit it, but we have relegated thought to the back burner, often times disparagingly.  “Instead of talking, why don’t you do something about it!” “Actions speak louder than words!”  Daphne, after all, caught more eyes than Velma.

The artificial physicality that western man has managed to lay all over significant portions of Earth have served, like Daphne, to distract us from more use of our cognitive or reflective skills.  Technology, innovation, the distraction economy, and ensuing and increased consumerism have eviscerated our capacity to think critically and severely reduced the time to sit down and reflect.

For example, I mentioned the distraction economy.  Social media companies have leveraged technology to extract more of the precious resource of time, contributing to changes in our ability to express ourselves in long form or our inability to pay attention for the extended period of time necessary for critical thinking.  We need more Velma time.

Distractions lay at the heart of colonizing the mind.  While social media has been taking a lot of heat lately for its use as a medium for spreading “fake news”, traditional media shares as much blame for creating narratives designed to sensationalize events and capture attention versus simply educating and creating a forum for outside-the-box thinking.

Protecting our “thought capital” from these growing incursions is especially necessary for blacks in America.  Blacks in America have little in terms of productive capital.  Blacks in America have more “creative capital.”  I won’t go through a laundry list here as to black contribution to the arts and entertainment.  I would like to see more recognition of black contribution to the development of applied sciences and how blacks are using applied sciences to directly impact their communities.

My more important point is that this creative capital cannot be further nurtured and leveraged for black consumption if our main engine, the mind and the thoughts that flow in and through it, are bombarded by distractions. In addition, we should support public policy that protects our intellectual property and artistic works as this “thought capital” becomes more important in a world that grows more dependent on knowledge.

We own our thoughts and should own the residuals that flow from them.  Our thoughts are the last and first frontier.

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Author: Alton Drew

I graduated from The Florida State University with a Bachelor of Science in economics and political science (1984); a Master of Public Administration (1993); and a Juris Doctor (1999). I am a member of the Maryland Bar and practice political law. You can follow me on Twitter @altondrew. You can email me at altondrew@altondrew.com.

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