Black social media documents how not to approach global political power …

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Commentary

Being a part of the African Diaspora, it is sad to see how Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have been analyzing the Russian invasion of Ukraine through emotionally tainted lenses. On Facebook, for example, Afros quickly donned digital banners on their feeds expressing support for Ukraine. Some adopted the left-wing media narrative of tying former US president Donald J. Trump to the actions of Vladimir Putin, an easy low-hanging fruit move by Mr Trump’s detractors given his past expressions of admiration for the Russian Federation president.

The media has inundated Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories with plenty of images that stoke emotional responses. Crying children, concerned parents, people trying to leave on trains, bombed out buildings, and a young Ukrainian president in military garb are the content for countless press photos on Twitter and Facebook. Afros in America and its Caribbean territories dutifully share these photos thus aiding the narrative’s virality. What is puzzling is how Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have not given any mention or included in their analyses similar actions taken by their own country with plenty of those actions based on contrivances just as grievous or more so than those conjured up by Mr Putin. Here are a few:

  1. The American invasion and occupation of Haiti from 1915 to 1934, under the guise of maintaining law and order so as to prevent European foreign influence in the island-nation.
  2. The American designed and supported Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in 1961, under the guise of stemming the influence of the Soviet Union and neutralizing Cuba’s new left-wing dictatorship.
  3. The Kennedy Administration’s implied approval of the assassination of South Vietnamese president Ngo Dinh Diem who had shown himself to be ineffective in garnering the people’s support against the North Vietnamese.
  4. The United States invasion in 1983 of the island-nation of Grenada, pursuant to the assertion that an airport under construction on the island-nation was intended to serve as a staging area for Soviet Union military aircraft. Troops from Jamaica and the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States also participated.

Fast forward to today and the Russian Federation is expressing its concern for possible NATO encroachment on Russia’s borders and that invasion of Ukraine is necessary for mitigating such a threat. Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have not taken into consideration that they have seen this behavior before on the part of the United States and that such behavior, albeit egregious, is par for the course in world politics.

And it’s not like war on the European continent is that unusual, even today. Blood on the European continent was spilled during the Yugoslav Wars from 1991 to 2001, yet none of the concerns we heard back then come close to the amplification we hear today.

Given our marginal political power status, standing on the sideline and and acting like we are at a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader audition brings no dividends. The only question that should be asked about now is, “How do we benefit from this conflict?” In the short and intermediate run, nada, especially since Ukraine is not a major trading partner of the United States or the Caribbean.

The longer run is a different matter. The removal of certain banks from the Society for Worldwide International Financial Transactions, freezing assets in American and European banks, and the suspension of the Russian stock market should not provide the African Diaspora with any reason to do back flips and shake their pom poms. Quite the opposite. It should make you scared. The world is not western Europe. The populations of China, India, and the continent of Africa alone account for over three billion people. Technology is not limited to the United States. These areas can, with a lot of feasible work, create their own regional, integrated political and economic systems and trade among themselves. If that were to happen, then Afros in America, who already, as a collective. are on the bottom rung will suffer as their US dollar loses more value and poor working families are faced with the increasingly daunting task of keeping food on the table.

Rather than sending “prayers up” for (and to) a bunch of people who, when the dust settles, will be doing better than you, it is time for Afro peoples in America and her Caribbean territories to ask themselves, “How do we prepare?”

Alton Drew

04.03.2022

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