Blacks don’t have to adhere to the nation-state concept …

The ‘country’ or ‘nation-state’ experience was never a part of African culture. It was never birthed into the DNA of Africans or into their descendants that were hauled into the western hemisphere. The concept was forced fed into them by westerners who needed to ensure uniform administration of human capital and natural resources in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean.

Ironically, the only group of Blacks that voluntarily adopted and incorporated the nation-state was the Haitian people who captured territory and created a nation the old fashioned and only legitimate way: by gun, machette, and blood. In my opinion, Haitians are the only Blacks on the planet that have a country (pursuant to the rules of this realm) for this reason.

None of that petitioning shit…

Given the roadblocks erected by Europeans to fully incorporate blacks into their political economies (just look at the U.S. Virgin Islands and its 103 year unincorporated status and only partial protection under the US Constitution), one wonders why Blacks don’t aggressively take the opportunity to create an independent socio-political-economic reality completely of their own?

The immediate response to that question tends to be the classic, pain and suffering driven, moralistic argument about this country or that country being built on the blood and sweat of Blacks. It is a narrative that Blacks hope whites will buy into, but after 503 years in the western hemisphere, Blacks should have learned by now that morals and emotions don’t build countries and sure don’t provide a full license to be included into existing ones.

With all the talk of the tumult of 2020, maybe the “universe” is signaling that Blacks are free to go and try another way; to create another “dimension” within or better yet overlaid on top of this one. With the domestic output, disposable income, and population that surpasses most countries on Earth, and an existing if not shaky affiliation with a continent rich in resources, Blacks have the potential to dominate multiple spaces on their own terms. Time for a will that equals the potential ..

Taking over the Democratic Party by leaving the Democratic Party…

No matter who wins the presidential election this fall, by the end of summer 2021, all those corporations promising investment in the black community will have reneged on said promises. The existing political-economic model was never designed to generate said promises. Even if implemented, the matrix of existing political-economic rules cannot sustain these promises.
 
Unfortunately for the Afro-Diaspora, none of its representatives in Congress have proven themselves bold enough or adept enough to create a coalition necessary for passing radical legislation that authorizes the “Fourth Branch” to take the necessary administrative steps to change the model. The steps voters will have to take is to clean these leaders out along with their younger progeny and heirs who hope to take their place. A one-swoop, multi-generational housecleaning is needed.
 
In other words, any under-40 aspiring politician who parrots the hat-in-hand, “massa hook me up” mantra of the current old heads in power needs to be discouraged from even running for county dog catcher much less a seat in government.
 
The Marines have a saying. We don’t care if you are a lawyer, doctor, engineer, mechanic, or administrative assistant. You are first and foremost a fighter. The Diaspora needs a new narrative based on critical thinking and less emotion. It is that narrative that will energize and guide the street fighters the Diaspora needs.
Politics is a blood sport. This is something the Republicans, and in particular members of the Hard Right, have come to realize. This is why, although their views are allegedly held by a minority but significant amount of the population, they have been able to hold significant sway over Congress, the White House, and state elections. They don’t have a big tent. They have a focused headquarters company of political operations and strategists.
 
Unlike Democrats who have conflated diversity in the rank and file to mean having multiple voices espousing multiple narratives, the GOP speaks with relatively one voice (although some will say the current one voice is the wrong voice).
 
Democrats have too many “Karens, Chads, and Biffs trying to lead and too many Keishas, Leroys, and Jeromes trying to impersonate them. The “Big Tent” needs to be cleaned out.
 
In all this confusion, head faking, and delusion, the promises of so called “equality” will fade away, and reality will raise its annoying head.
 
Chaos, however, should not be looked upon with despair. Rather, this is an opportunity for the Diaspora to create what I term ‘controlled anarchy.’ Rather than stepping in and trying to save the Chad, Becky, Biff, Karen-led Democrats, the Diaspora should clean its own house and then implement a plan of arms length manipulation of the Democratic Party with the end game of getting the Party back to its original mission: to serve the interest of the common man.
 
As the economy changes to a model that is further opposite of the needs of the average Afro-Diaspora man and woman trying to make their way, it is time for Afro people to stop trying to equate to or be white, and create a political model that in the end, ironically, serves everyone.

Identifying the economic value within the African Diaspora and designing currency to transmit it …

Today while waiting for a haircut, a lovely young lady, who was waiting on her companion, asked me if I was a professor.  I was caught off guard by the question for it seemed almost prescient in nature.  I had been an adjunct professor back in Maryland, I told her.  She then asked if I had been on television. Again I informed her that I had made two appearances on a business news channel.  I expected the exchange to end there since her companion was finished with his haircut, but fortunately the conversation did not end there.  She proceeded to ask my opinion about the current state of the economy as it impacted black people.  I was happy to oblige since the topic was interesting and yes, when you get to engage a very attractive woman on the state of the political economy (underscore very attractive), you don’t pass it up.

The conversation turned to whether African Diaspora communities could use their own currency.  My answer was yes, but to get there we have to first identify a resource that could be used to generate an underlying value for the currency.  A true community is built on a resource the extraction, processing, and distribution of which leads to an industry that generates the income necessary for sustaining the communities members.

Second, there has to be a banking/financing resource in place to convert the assets of the underlying resource into loanable funds.

Right now we have very little of the above two components.  For example, Africans in America hold very little of its capital.  By some estimates, Africans in America hold approximately two percent of total capital in the United States. In addition, consider farm holdings by Africans in America.  Africans in America hold approximately two percent of all farms in the United States, according to the website ShoppeBlack.us.

Compounding the farmland problem is the lack of strong financial infrastructure through which not only lending can be accomplished but also trade in the securities that have underlying them black farm output.  There are approximately 45 black-owned farms located in 20 U.S. states.  There are, however, 14 black owned banks located in eleven states to support these farms.  It is a strong financial infrastructure that provides funding for land acquisition, seed, and new equipment and the current black owned facilities for lending are not enough.

Money is created when loaned funds for land acquisition, seed, and equipment are placed in a farmer’s checking account.  At this point black-owned banks could issue currency distributed by the Federal Reserve or create its own currency where a special currency is designed to be used by black farmers and any other industries related to or depending on black-owned farms including black-owned suppliers, black-owned restaurants, black-owned pharmacies and wellness stores, etc.

There is theory and there is application. With one to two trillion dollars in output, Africans in America could invest in more farmland while expanding their financial infrastructure in order to support lending, securitization of debt, and issuance of their own debt.  Where more land is not available, the next move may have to be the cultivation of intellectual capital and thus make greater inroads into the creative industry space.

On the other hand, Africans in America, rather than trying to replicate the existing model, may have to consider a completely new model for generating and trading currency, one where the resource is unique to and managed solely by Africans in America.

 

Will regulating social media benefit content providers in the African Diaspora?

Late last May, President Donald Trump stepped up his battle with social media by issuing an executive order intended to prevent the censure of political speech expressed on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.  Mr Trump allegedly saw the last straw when Twitter showed the nerve to fact check the President by attaching a number of links to some of Mr Trump’s tweets.  He didn’t like that.

Mr Trump is not alone in his frustration with social media.  Other Republicans and conservatives have complained in recent years about what they deem as bias against conservative political viewpoints and alleged liberal political positions taken up by executives at the social media companies.

To combat the alleged bias, Mr Trump issued an executive order that would call for the Federal Communications Commission to issue rules that clarify portions of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 (47 USC 230).  The Act excludes Twitter, Facebook, and other interactive computer services from civil liability where they exercise good faith in removing and otherwise not accepting certain harmful content.  Taking censorship action beyond the scope of the “Good Samaritan” exceptions would paint them as publishers and cost them their protection from civil liability claims.

Specifically the Act reads as follows:

(c)Protection for “Good Samaritan” blocking and screening of offensive material

(1)Treatment of publisher or speaker

No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.

(2)Civil liability. No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be held liable on account of—

(A)
any action voluntarily taken in good faith to restrict access to or availability of material that the provider or user considers to be obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing, or otherwise objectionable, whether or not such material is constitutionally protected; or

(B)

any action taken to enable or make available to information content providers or others the technical means to restrict access to material described in paragraph (1).[1]

Mr Trump would like rules that clarify the interaction between section (c)(1), exemption from treatment as a publisher, and section (c)(2), exemption from liability of a publisher, of the Communications Decency Act.  My issue is whether Mr Trump’s proposed path of action in any way hinders the ability of the African Diaspora community to exchange ideas and content for commercial purposes?

Maya Dollarhide defines social media as a:

” …. computer-based technology that facilitates the sharing of ideas, thoughts, and information through the building of virtual networks and communities. By design, social media is internet-based and gives users quick electronic communication of content. Content includes personal information, documents, videos, and photos. Users engage with social media via computer, tablet or smartphone via web-based software or web application, often utilizing it for messaging.”

A high percentage of adults within the African Diaspora use social media.  According to Pew Research, 69% of African American adults use at least one social media site compared to 73% of whites.  Whites and blacks appear on par when it comes to social media usage.

When it comes to commercial reasons for using social media, 29% of consumers use social media platforms to research or buy products and services.  Although the “social” or lately the “political” component of social media gets a lot of attention these days, there is a marketing component to social media where these networks allow for businesses to engage with their customers.  Social media provides a relatively lower cost alternative to traditional media marketing mechanisms.  A well done social media campaign can have information go “viral” about goods or services, and send this information instantaneously around the globe.

We have to be mindful that the drafting and implementation of rules to be used to keep social media companies in compliance with the Communications Decency Act may not come to pass depending on the outcome of this fall’s election.  Should Mr Trump lose in November, the Democratic victor will likely put in place a Democratic chairman and along with his or her Democratic colleagues squash the idea of going forward with any rules that give the impression that the Commission has entered the business as social media speech police.

Even if Mr Trump wins and a Republican majority remains in place at the Commission, I believe the Commission will craft very narrow rules in order to prevent any First Amendment violations.  More importantly, rules that keep social media companies from acting as editors benefit the global exchange of commercial information between members of the African Diaspora.

While I doubt that it is ever in the best interest of Facebook to edit or alter purely commercial communications, advertisements, etc. between an African American wholesaler in Atlanta, Georgia and potential retail distributors and/or end users in Accra,  Ghana, added protections that keep communications unimpeded cannot hurt.

The narrower the rules, the better it is for our self-interests.