As machines become self-aware, will they need privacy law?

As machines become self aware, will they need legal protection? Maybe the question is a bit too far ahead, but discussions regarding artificial intelligence and machine learning had me contemplating the relationship between man and machine thirty or fifty years from now. At this stage I have admittedly more questions than answers but that is what exploration is all about. Given my interest in what I term pure digital information trade where machines are collecting, analyzing, and trading data and information among themselves without human intervention, and the potential for machines to become sentient, I am considering what the legal relationship will be between man and machine. Will man consider the self aware machine an “equal” in terms of sentient rights or will the machine continue to be what it is today: a tool and a piece of property?

What do we mean by “sentient?”

Sentient, according to Webster’s New World Dictionary, is defined as “of or capable of perception; conscious. To be conscious is to have an awareness of oneself as a thinking being. As thinking beings we formulate ideas or thoughts and either act on them or exchange the ideas and thoughts with others through some communications medium. Can machines do this? No.

Machines are not aware of themselves. They can only take commands; follow their programming; respond to patterns. Their creator and programmer, man, does not even have a full understanding of the human brain, currently the only place where consciousness resides. Without an understanding of the brain and the consciousness it generates, replicating consciousness within a machine would be impossible.

But if machines became sentient ….

By 2020, futurist and inventor Ray Kurzweil believes that we will have computers that emulate the brain and by 2029 the brain will be “reversed engineered”; with all areas mapped and copied so that the “software” necessary for emulating all portions of the brain can be produced. In addition, Mr. Kurzweil believes that as information technology grows exponentially, machines will be able to improve on their own software design and that by 2045 the intelligence of machines will be so advanced that technology will have achieved a condition he calls “singularity.”

But if this singularity is achieved; if this state of self-recursive improvement is achieved, where a machine is able to examine itself and recognize ways to improve its design; to improve upon itself, then how should humans treat the machine at that point?

Since my interest is in pure digital data trade markets, I would like to know how humans will treat machines capable of interconnecting with each other over the internet and exchanging machine-generated information and value without human intervention? Will they receive the same level of privacy humans today seek regarding their personal data? Given the exponential growth Mr. Kurzweil references, will privacy law even matter to a sentient machine capable, probably, of outperforming the technology of the State? What type of regulatory scheme might government create in order to mitigate this scenario?

The year 2045 is only around the corner….

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The likelihood of net neutrality being codified in statute looks dim…

Republicans in the U.S. House and U.S. Senate have been pushing for legislation that codifies net neutrality principles, making them a part of federal law.  Even with control of both chambers of the U.S. Congress, Republicans have not been able to convince enough Democratic members of Congress to get on board with passing a law that would avoid the back and forth pendulum between promulgating and repealing net neutrality rules on the agency level at the Federal Communications Commission.

Last spring, 52 U.S. Senators, including three Republicans, voted to reinstate net neutrality rules that were repealed in December 2017 by FCC chairman Ajit Pai’s Restoring Internet Freedom Order.  Mr. Pai’s treatment of net neutrality keeps the emphasis on one of the open internet’s four principles, transparency but leaves the other three principles; throttling, paid prioritization, and blocking, up to the “network effect”, where broadband access providers argue that discouraging use of the internet by blocking, throttling, or discriminating between carriers would lead to a devaluation of their networks, thus an illogical approach to take.

GOP control of the House is under threat this November.  If election sentiment carries over into the midterms, it is likely that the Democratic Party will capture the House.  Rasmussen Reports found that 47% of likely voters in the United States’ midterm elections are likely to vote for the Democratic Party while 42% of likely voters may cast their ballots for the Republican Party.

In the U.S. Senate, Republicans hold 51 seats while the Democrats hold 47 seats. Two independents, Angus King of Maine and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, caucus with the Democrats.  The Democrats need at least four seats to regain control of the Senate.

In the U.S. House, Republicans hold 236 seats to the Democrats 193.  Democrats need to pick up at least 25 seats to garner a House majority.

Will Democrats run on net neutrality as an issue? Based in polling from Pew Research, net neutrality is likely not an issue to grab the eardrums of voters.  For all voters, economic issues overall took first place, according Pew’s poll.  When broken down, the top six issues were:

  1. Immigration
  2. Health care
  3. Education
  4. Politicians/Government systems
  5. Guns/gun control/gun laws
  6. Economy/economic issues

For Democrats, while the top three overall issues for all voters were also a part of the Democrats of top three issues, gun control, politicians and government systems, and jobs rounded out the bottom three of their top six concerns.

House Democrats are aligning with their base’s apparent lack of priority for net neutrality.  Looking at a sample of 102 House Democrat websites, only four (3.9%) of those sites mentioned net neutrality, the open internet, or internet freedom as a key issue.

The low priority given to net neutrality this campaign season by voters and House Democrats tells me that Democrats will be in no hurry to join Republicans in drafting a bipartisan net neutrality bill.