Interbank Market News Scan: Federal Reserve Board chairman appears before the U.S. Senate banking committee …

15 July 2021

Federal Reserve Board chairman continues testimony before Congress.

Federal Reserve Board chairman Jerome Powell is expected today to share with the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs the same testimony shared yesterday with the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services.

Mr Powell, while acknowledging growth in the economy and the threat of increasing prices, did not indicate any changes in the Federal Reserve’s current asset purchase program.  The Federal Reserve will maintain its purchase of Treasury securities and agency mortgage-backed securities totaling $120 billion a month.  

For a consultation on any regulatory or legislative discussions or announcements during today’s hearing, please reach out to us at altondrew@altondrew.com to reserve an appointment.

Exchange rates of interest as of 10:30 am AST

Currency pairExchange rate
AUD/USD*0.7448
EUR/USD*1.1812
GBP/USD*1.3854
USD/CAD*1.2520
USD/CHF*0.9143
USD/JPY*109.9600
USD/XCD+2.7000
USD/NGN+410.5130
USD/MXN*19.9260

Sources: *Reuters +OANDA

Rates reported by the Federal Reserve (Release Date 14 July 2021)

Effective Fed Funds Rate: 0.10%

Discount Window:  0.25%

Prime Bank Rate: 3.25%

4-week Treasury bill: 0.05%

3-month Treasury bill: 0.05%

6-month Treasury bill: 0.06%

1-year Treasury bill: 0.08%

A quick thought: Quieted by a 50-50 Senate split …

“A 50-50 split in the Senate with a reduced Democratic majority in the House not only puts the GOP back into their familiar position as “obstructionist”, but gives Biden-Harris some cover to not present as progressive an agenda as the Far Left would like to see. Centrist and center-right senators like Angus King, Susan Collins, Rand Paul, and Joe Manchin will take more of the spotlight.

Mitch McConnell will still play the “parliamentarian” role, using Senate rules to delay floor debates, filibuster, or, if he is lucky, table certain items.

The last thing Kamala Harris will want, as president of the Senate, is the optics of having to do a yay or nay on any progressive legislation. She’d rather Collins, Paul, and Company head off any controversial bills before they hit the floor for a vote. She can’t afford to enter the 2024 presidential race inaccurately labeled a progressive.

Commodity, currency, and energy traders may get over their initial nervousness about the volatility a liberal Congress may introduce when they realize that the “adults” are finally in charge …