Where Black political leadership failed on Ukraine …

Angus Roxburgh recently wrote an honest and insightful piece for The Guardian about how Western nations can bring about a quicker end to the conflict in Eastern Europe. Mr Roxburgh recommends that all interests of each stakeholder be taken into account in order to reach a resolution.  In the article he states the following:

“To get Putin to the negotiating table at all, everything would have to be up for discussion – including Ukraine’s borders, Russia’s age-old security concerns, perhaps even the very logic of basing today’s international frontiers in that part of Europe on what were internal borders in the USSR, drawn up by communist leaders precisely to prevent Soviet republics and regions from being viable independent states. The outcome of the talks does not need to be predetermined. The important thing is to talk rather than fight.”  

I agree with his assessment.  Americans in general and Black Americans in particular have begun and ended their analysis of the conflict with the mantra of Russia’s “unprovoked” attack on Ukraine.  In the world of geopolitics, I doubt there is such a thing as “unprovoked.”  Most Americans, for example, fail to incorporate into their conclusion that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was unprovoked when history demonstrates that United States’ aggression in the Pacific, particularly the restriction of access by Japan to oil supplies, was enough to rile up the Japanese to embark on a plan to push the United States out of the Pacific.  Japan’s attack was not unprovoked. It was a responsive measure.

A similar argument can be made by Russia.  For decades they have been apprehensive about the West, particularly the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s encroachment on then Union of Soviet Socialist Republics now Russia’s borders.  The fall of the USSR and NATO’s influence on Eastern Europe has been enough to give Vladimir Putin a few nightmares.  I could make the argument that Mr Putin’s 2022 invasion was also a preemptive strike much like Japan’s preventive strike in 1945.

To make this kind of analysis requires stepping outside of the flashing disco ball and looking at all sides of the issue, especially if the issue has some sort of ramifications economically.  Stepping outside of the issue in order to account for as many factors as possible aids in strategic positioning.  For the black community, applying this rule puts it in a position to garner more tangibles from trading in the political markets.

For example, black political leadership has fallen in lock step with the media and political narrative that the Ukrainians are Luke Skywalker and Russia is represented by the evil Darth Vader.  Black leadership never took on the burden of educating the black community on the factors and environment that turned Anakin Skywalker into Darth Vader.  The overnight conversion of a group of Americans, who on 23 February 2022, couldn’t find Ukraine on a map, into flag waving Ukraine supporters on 24 February 2022 is near stunning. 

Black leadership apparently did what it did best: exchanged aggregated black support for a few political campaign finance crumbs from the leadership of the Democratic and Republican parties. 

True black political leadership would have leveraged black community political and demographic clout on a peace campaign.  Imagine black elected leadership getting 20 million blacks to write their representatives and the leadership of NATO expressing their displeasure with military action; recommending and urging a peace settlement; threatening their own domestic and foreign economic embargo as a response to unfair treatment of blacks in Ukraine; and not participating in the 2022 or 2024 U.S. elections if their demands were not met? 

This kind of leadership could have cemented American blacks not only as a domestic political force but as a player on the world stage.

This kind of leadership calls for vision.  Unfortunately, the black community’s current leadership does not have this kind of vision…  

Alton Drew

3 May 2022

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Black social media documents how not to approach global political power …

Commentary

Being a part of the African Diaspora, it is sad to see how Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have been analyzing the Russian invasion of Ukraine through emotionally tainted lenses. On Facebook, for example, Afros quickly donned digital banners on their feeds expressing support for Ukraine. Some adopted the left-wing media narrative of tying former US president Donald J. Trump to the actions of Vladimir Putin, an easy low-hanging fruit move by Mr Trump’s detractors given his past expressions of admiration for the Russian Federation president.

The media has inundated Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories with plenty of images that stoke emotional responses. Crying children, concerned parents, people trying to leave on trains, bombed out buildings, and a young Ukrainian president in military garb are the content for countless press photos on Twitter and Facebook. Afros in America and its Caribbean territories dutifully share these photos thus aiding the narrative’s virality. What is puzzling is how Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have not given any mention or included in their analyses similar actions taken by their own country with plenty of those actions based on contrivances just as grievous or more so than those conjured up by Mr Putin. Here are a few:

  1. The American invasion and occupation of Haiti from 1915 to 1934, under the guise of maintaining law and order so as to prevent European foreign influence in the island-nation.
  2. The American designed and supported Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in 1961, under the guise of stemming the influence of the Soviet Union and neutralizing Cuba’s new left-wing dictatorship.
  3. The Kennedy Administration’s implied approval of the assassination of South Vietnamese president Ngo Dinh Diem who had shown himself to be ineffective in garnering the people’s support against the North Vietnamese.
  4. The United States invasion in 1983 of the island-nation of Grenada, pursuant to the assertion that an airport under construction on the island-nation was intended to serve as a staging area for Soviet Union military aircraft. Troops from Jamaica and the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States also participated.

Fast forward to today and the Russian Federation is expressing its concern for possible NATO encroachment on Russia’s borders and that invasion of Ukraine is necessary for mitigating such a threat. Afro people in America and its Caribbean territories have not taken into consideration that they have seen this behavior before on the part of the United States and that such behavior, albeit egregious, is par for the course in world politics.

And it’s not like war on the European continent is that unusual, even today. Blood on the European continent was spilled during the Yugoslav Wars from 1991 to 2001, yet none of the concerns we heard back then come close to the amplification we hear today.

Given our marginal political power status, standing on the sideline and and acting like we are at a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader audition brings no dividends. The only question that should be asked about now is, “How do we benefit from this conflict?” In the short and intermediate run, nada, especially since Ukraine is not a major trading partner of the United States or the Caribbean.

The longer run is a different matter. The removal of certain banks from the Society for Worldwide International Financial Transactions, freezing assets in American and European banks, and the suspension of the Russian stock market should not provide the African Diaspora with any reason to do back flips and shake their pom poms. Quite the opposite. It should make you scared. The world is not western Europe. The populations of China, India, and the continent of Africa alone account for over three billion people. Technology is not limited to the United States. These areas can, with a lot of feasible work, create their own regional, integrated political and economic systems and trade among themselves. If that were to happen, then Afros in America, who already, as a collective. are on the bottom rung will suffer as their US dollar loses more value and poor working families are faced with the increasingly daunting task of keeping food on the table.

Rather than sending “prayers up” for (and to) a bunch of people who, when the dust settles, will be doing better than you, it is time for Afro peoples in America and her Caribbean territories to ask themselves, “How do we prepare?”

Alton Drew

04.03.2022