Fifty years after MLK’s death, the civil rights movement has become a revenue stream for event planners

I don’t know if it is still done, but I remember watching some movie filmed in black and white where in one scene there was an attractive white girl walking around with a box strapped in front of her containing cigarette cartons. She would use her voice, smile, and good looks to charm the men in the room into buying a cancer stick or two. From a consumer perspective this type of traction creation for marketing and selling product is standard operation.  I see it when good looking women are pictured on magazine covers laying on the top of race cars. I see it at conferences when the best looking bartenders are placed behind the cash bar. I see it when a pretty face women is placed at the receptionist desk of an office or at the registration table of an event.

An event planner realizes that her staff responsible for connecting with clients must be able to create a level of trust and comfort such that the client pays attention to what the event’s sponsors are selling. The sponsors want event planners to weave the sponsors’ products into an event’s theme creating exposure of the product’s benefits to the prospective consumer. The greater the exposure to the product, the greater the likelihood of a sale in the short or immediate term.

In politics, political messages are the products pushed through partisan politics channels. Those messages ask tax payers to vote for a particular candidate or support some policy. Today’s post Martin Luther King civil rights movement has become an event planning channel for partisan messages from the left. Some of the “event planners” are familiar to some of you: the NAACP, the National Urban League, the National Action Network, the National Rainbow Coalition. Others have emerged over the past decade such as Color of Change and Black Lives Matter. Their business model is simple. Led by a bunch of college educated black elites, they invite people from the black masses to participate in forums, panel discussions, parades, etc., where they can discuss issues impacting the “black community.” During these forums they intertwine the messages of the progressive left and then close with calls to action, including during an election season, a call for blacks to vote for liberals.

During Dr King’s time, civil rights leaders exchanged information and inspiration in their church meetings. Other than planting a bug in a church (I wouldn’t be surprised if the FBI did this often), you couldn’t “hack” these meetings unless you convinced civil rights leaders that it was important for you, especially as a non-white, to attend. Contrary to the images you saw on “Mississippi Burning”, of helpless blacks dependent on the white man to get him through, black Americans were very resourceful in addressing and pressing their grievances on their own.

Today they have been convinced that a “go it alone” approach is not feasible. By relying less on their own resources, blacks have opened themselves up the carpet bagging of liberals who have sold them on a new corporate model where the black civil rights movement is underwritten by the Democratic Party and other progressive groups. There is a price to pay for the underwriting. The price is a dilution of message.

Now civil rights has extended to groups that quite frankly don’t need civil rights attention or protection: white women, other ethnic groups, and the LGBTQ communities. Black Americans have been pushed so far down to the bottom of the civil rights ladder that they are a fossilized movement, compressed by the weight of all the other communities that have managed to get ahead of them that today, just like the fossils of dead dinosaurs and mammals, they are fueling the civil and human rights campaigns of everyone else.

Martin Luther King’s death removed any last viability of a movement that was moving its focus toward economic empowerment. The movement opted to go the route of political empowerment, falling for its glamour and surface glitz. That power has traditionally been urban based, but as whites return to core cities and old black neighborhoods gentrify, that power is quickly eroding. Fifty years after his death, all the black civil rights movement may have going for it is putting another event on a calendar.

Voluntary market agreements not FCC should create incubators.

The Federal Communications Commission today issued a notice of proposed rulemaking as a first step toward creating an incubator program for disadvantaged groups that want to enter the television and radio broadcast industries. According to the Commission, “Such a program would seek to encourage new and diverse broadcast station owners by drawing on the technical expertise and/or financial assistance of existing broadcasters.”

The NPRM also seeks comment from the public on how best to structure and implement the program.

The State via the Commission has a monopoly on access to spectrum. It has the force of law behind this monopoly. It should, for the sake of bond holders, pursue policies that help increase returns on the spectrum that it licenses to private companies. The better broadcast companies perform i.e. attract listeners and views and sell advertisement, the more taxable income for the State and continued flow of income to bond holders.

I don’t see this incubator program doing that. It is a pure political move. It is designed to keep the barbarians aka social justice warriors from knocking down the gate. The Commission has been holding the warriors off since the Clinton Administration by not following through on recommendations to institute such programs. It appears now, with this NPRM, that they are trying to give the impression of progress on the issue of diversity.

They should save their strength.

Any incubation for future broadcast station owners can be done in the private sector. Potential and existing broadcast station owners can enter into voluntary agreements to exchange expertise and financial assistance in exchange for a piece of a minority owner’s action. It should be up to a potential minority owner to explain the economic and financial value that an existing broadcast station owner can glean from an investment in a minority-owned station or outright sale of an existing station to a minority-owned firm.

Think of the decision rule the British Empire imposed on itself when it decided to decolonize. The second world war drained the Empire of resources. Holding on to territories in Africa and the Caribbean was expensive, so they cut a deal with these protectorates. We’ll prepare you for independence and you’ll give us a piece of the economic action.

This is the model that existing broadcast station owners and potential minority-owned firms should enter. Where the existing owner wants to off-load a station and a minority firm shows it can bring value, then they can enter an exchange. The State via the Commission need not involve itself by establishing incubator programs.